Windows against hurricanes

App

images windows against hurricanes

Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Order shutters, H tracks, and F tracks from your local home construction store or from a metals or plastics distributor. If you're doing it yourself, measure the window height and the shutter height. They will not help. Install your storm shutters or hire a professional to install them. Hire a professional to give you all-new windows. In most cases, your dealer will install the fabric panels for you. Consider investing in fabric storm panels. There is lots of misinformation about hurricane safety, and one persistent myth is that putting tape in an X or a grid over a window provides reinforcement.

  • How to Protect Windows from a Hurricane 8 Steps (with Pictures)

  • There are steps you can take to protect your windows and doors from hurricanes.

    images windows against hurricanes

    Not only can these improvements pay off during a hurricane, but they might. Consider a cheap DIY fix like hurricane film or plywood covers. Installing metal, plastic, or fabric over your windows, or replacing them with high-impact glass, will protect your windows and qualify you for lower homeowner's insurance premiums at the same time.

    Install plywood. How to Protect Windows from Hurricanes. Hurricanes can cause serious damage to your home and may be very frightening.

    images windows against hurricanes

    If a hurricane is approaching, board.
    Besides the instructions, the bolts, and the wing nuts included with your purchase, you will need a screwdriver. Fabric storm panels are more expensive than metal and plastic panels, but they come with some advantages.

    Video: Windows against hurricanes How to Properly Protect Your Windows During a Hurricane Like Irma

    This article was a collaboration of several members of our editing staff who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. Measure the perimeter of all your windows. Purchasing high-impact glass will likely lower your insurance premium.

    images windows against hurricanes

    images windows against hurricanes
    Windows against hurricanes
    Sign in to report inappropriate content. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy.

    More Report Need to report the video? Replace your windows with high-impact glass. ABC Newsviews. Unsubscribe from Inside Edition?

    Keep your windows closed during a storm.

    You see it on TV every time there's a hurricane threatening the coast: businesses and homes with giant duct-tape "X"s on their windows.

    But the truth is that. Worry less with hurricane windows and doors.

    Video: Windows against hurricanes Hurricane-proof your Windows and Doors

    HurricaneShield is Pella's impact resistant technology developed to protect your home. Hurricane-resistant windows are expensive, but they can provide great benefits and can save your home from complete destruction.
    Warnings Do not use duct tape or other household materials to protect your windows. They are quite expensive, but once they're up they will look like ordinary windows.

    How to Protect Windows from a Hurricane 8 Steps (with Pictures)

    Consider investing in fabric storm panels. They're built to resist winds of miles per hour, but Irma has been packing winds of up to miles per hour. Consider a cheap DIY fix like hurricane film or plywood covers.

    images windows against hurricanes
    Like or not app viber
    Warnings Do not use duct tape or other household materials to protect your windows.

    Rating is available when the video has been rented. Hurricane film is an affordable transparent plastic that you can leave in place year-round.

    Depending on the kind of shutters you buy, you may need panels the same size as your window, or panels that are several inches larger on every side. Measure the perimeter of your windowpanes and buy enough film to cover each windowpane entirely. Purchasing high-impact glass will likely lower your insurance premium. Keep your windows closed during a storm.

    4 thoughts on “Windows against hurricanes